creative center.

Do You See the Wires or Do You See the SKY?

Sandy Boyle 05/01/2019

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I get up every morning between 3 and 6 AM to have my oatmeal with the first round of my MS medicine.  Believe me, I could easily complain that my retired butt is up so early in the morning, but, for my health, I had to reformat my normal M.O. to stop concentrating on the negatives.  I now deliberately look for and appreciate the beautiful things.

With me getting up, the dogs are alerted to our normal routine.  It’s their time to do their business, which means food comes afterwards.  So, after unlocking the back door, <POOF> there’s that sky! WOW!  It demands my attention.  The question is, can YOU see it?

Do you see the intrusive wires of life, or do you see the delivery of that stunning sky?  It’s a metaphor for the accruements of MS and how it’s always laying wires to obstruct your view and block your joy in life.  If you see the wires, you’re like I was and it’s time for retraining.   I suspect that, if you see the wires and not the sky, you may be also concentrating on the pins & needles, the pain, the imbalance, the vision issues, the malfunctioning limbs…etc. of MS.   All these are not my symptoms, and they’re certainly not all inclusive to the plethora of jinxes MS hits us with.  So, how can you NOT see the wires-metaphorically speaking?  There is a training plan to accomplish this.  You learned to walk, so this too is doable.  Take that picture for example.

I’ve always seen the gorgeousness of nature, but would contort myself to get that view to eliminate the ugly of industry in my shot.  However, I’ve recently begun to overlook the so-called ugly markings of industry’s footprints in lieu of the unquestionable beauty of nature.  After all, my iPhone took that picture, that was charged by the cord, that connects to the wiring, that adheres to the telephone pole, and allows the power of life to be possible in today’s day & age.

Once you figure out that those wires are why you don’t overheat in 110° temperatures in the dead of summer because it supplies power to your Air-conditioning unit.  Those ugly hoses and cables are why your coffee machine supplies what you need in that kick-starter cup in the morning and breaking news to catch you up on the world.   When you start thinking like that, those wires no longer seem as ugly- they have their own beauty in their absolute necessity.

So, the time is here to retrain yourself to see the beauty of the sky and omit the noticing of the wires. At a minimum, I suggest everything you see as intrusive probably has a good side. Even your malfunctioning body will have good days. So when you’re having a bad day, remember all the things you did on that good day and don’t let those wires obstruct your view of that pretty sky.

I hope my true stories have inspired others to navigate and thrive despite MS.  Maybe something I’ve written gives them clues that might help deal with and in some cases, recover from some of the symptoms they experience.  I think it’s important to share lessons learned with this ridiculous disease.  If you haven’t read my stories, please read them in order so you can see how I’ve evolved to cope with MS:

  • “Oh Yeah? Take THAT!!!!” (Shows the tenacity required to overcome…for me at least)
  • “Savor the Ahhs” (shows the importance of recognizing and savoring all the good things)
  • “A Cure for Couchitus” (an inspiration to get moving again)
  • Poem, “Pain = Stress = Rage” (which shows an imperfect morning and to forgive yourself for your own frustrations)
  • “Mechanical Me”, (advice on getting better movement from your MS inflicted body)
  • “Coincidental Epiphany” (shows a restaurant experience in the worst case scenario to an enlightened improved symptomology).
  • “Mary Jo was MY FRIEND- she IS your Neighbor ” (A very personal snapshot of time where life goes on despite MS.  It’s also a significant loss for me, and a failing report card).

If one person gains one line of inspiration from anything I’ve written- my mission has been successful.

 

 

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